GUILLERMO BONFIL BATALLA MEXICO PROFUNDO PDF

MÉXICO PROFUNDO: Reclaiming a Civilization by. Guillermo Bonfil Batalla. Translated by Philip A. Dennis. University of Texas Press, Austin. Institute of Latin . México Profundo has ratings and 15 reviews. Elisa said: Guillermo Bonfil traza dos Méxicos diferentes en dos categorías bien definidas: 1) El Méxic. For Guillermo Bonfil Batalla, the remaining Indian communities, the “de- Indianized” rural mestizo communities, and vast sectors of the poor.

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Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. Reclaiming a Civilization by Guillermo Bonfil Gyillermo. This translation gatalla a major work in Mexican anthropology argues that Mesoamerican civilization is prfoundo ongoing and undeniable force in contemporary Mexican life. For Guillermo Bonfil Batalla, the remaining Indian communities, the “de-Indianized” rural mestizo communities, and vast sectors of the poor urban population constitute mxeico Mexico profundo.

Their lives and ways of un This translation of a major work in Mexican anthropology argues that Mesoamerican civilization is an ongoing and undeniable force in contemporary Mexican life. Their lives and ways of understanding the world continue to be rooted in Mesoamerican civilization. An ancient agricultural complex profudo their food supply, and work is understood as a way of maintaining a harmonious relationship with the natural world.

Health is related to human conduct, and community service is often part of each individual’s life obligation. Time is circular, and humans fulfill their own cycle in relation to other cycles of the universe. Since the Conquest, Bonfil argues, the peoples of the Mexico profundo have been dominated by an “imaginary Mexico” imposed by the West. It is imaginary not because it does not exist, but batapla it denies the cultural reality lived daily by most Mexicans.

Within the Mexico profundo there exists an enormous body of accumulated knowledge, as well as successful patterns for living together and adapting to the natural world.

To face the future successfully, argues Bonfil, Mexico must build on these strengths of Mesoamerican civilization, “one of the few original civilizations that humanity has created throughout all its history.

Paperbackpages. Published January 1st by University of Texas Press. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.

Lists with This Book. Jun 22, Elisa rated it liked it Shelves: May 24, John rated it it was amazing. Raza and Native American majors and who are concerned about Indigenous rights.

Recommended to LonewolfMX by: Through secretnisation and appropriating elements of the oppressors to help them survive. Even with defeat of the Spaniards and Mexican independence the new ruling classes dismissed the Indigenous cultures as backward and inferior even with the Indigenismo of the and 30 did little to improve the Guuillermo peoples situation as the government was mostly concerned with the Mestizaje and how to incorporate the Native into the now Mestizo Mexican society by “redeeming the Indian with his disappearance” who many theorists at that time believed that it was the “Indian” that kept Mexico in poverty!!

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I feel that Mexican society and Chicanos here in the US can learn a lot about Native peoples as a marginalized group, which cannot be ignored. Sep 18, Luis Eduardo rated it it was amazing.

Jan 19, Pilar rated it it was amazing. Aug 12, Tomek rated it it was amazing Shelves: I do not think one can understand Mexico without reading this book though that is not to say that in reading this book you will understand Mexico. Batalla’s magnum opus is not a history, though it does summarize the nation’s history. It is not an anthropological study, though it does describe the diverse cultures of Mexico.

Baatlla is not a socioeconomic treatise, though it does detail the sociological and economic realities the Mexican people face. So if it lrofundo not any of these things, what is it? It is a broad vision of what is in Mexico, how it came to be, and how it might be depending on the path we decide to take.

The book has provided me with as detailed an understanding for modern social movements in Mexico, including the Zapatistas, as any.

It has fundamentally changed my perspectives on some of the conclusions that I drew for myself about Mexican culture, and reinforced others by providing details that I, as an outsider and non-expert, would likely not be able to observe. The book is not without its weaknesses, in my humble opinion. First off, why did Batalla limit himself the profundo or indigenous experience to the borders of the modern Mexican nation state? Surely these experiences transcend modern borders.

For instance, if we are to consider the Medico as a distinct cultural group who reside in Mexico, Guatemala, Belize, and Honduras, they are not only a part of proundo Mexico profundo, but indeed, the American profundo. Second, I found that he uses many terms broadly, giullermo as civilization, culture, and tradition without first providing a concrete definition.

While this could be purposeful, as defining such terms may be a fool’s errand, but it would be a useful none the less. Finally, in his final solution, Batalla calls for a pluralistic society that involves both Western and indigenous knowledge and culture.

However, I wonder if this is possible given the voracity of the former in devouring its children. Regardless, I consider this book to be absolutely fascinating. Despite the heavy and academic subject, it is amazingly easy to read. Batalla writes with clean and poetic prose, and the English translation is excellent, maintaining the tone of the original which is often difficult to attain for such a dense book. Finally, unlike many works which point out the problem without offering a solution which is perfectly fine, if incompletethis one paints a brilliant future.

Perhaps it is utopian and naive, but it manages to recognize the challenges without falling into despair. Perhaps the best book on Mexico ever written.

Mexico profundo is the Mesoamerican cultural package under pressure, ignored, disregarded since the arrival of the Europeans.

Bonfil called for a cultural pluralism where the pre-Columbian cultural patrimony and practices be implemented, and that the failed Guillerko models be rejected, or at least that they share space with a pluralist culture where people depend on each other and not on the imaginary culture, the imaginary Mexico that has never exist Perhaps the best book on Mexico ever written.

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Bonfil called for a cultural pluralism where the pre-Columbian cultural patrimony and practices be implemented, and that the failed Western models be rejected, or at least that they share space with a vuillermo culture where people depend on each other and not on the imaginary culture, the imaginary Mexico that has never existed.

México Profundo: Reclaiming a Civilization – Guillermo Bonfil Batalla – Google Books

Batapla 25, Roy Angles rated it really liked protundo. May 21, anabandana rated it really liked it Shelves: Intelligently written criticism of the damage of Westeen colonization in Mexico, applicable to all of the Americas.

A poignant juxtaposition between the imaginary societies colonialism intended to create and the resistance of the culturas profundas. My only criticism to the author includes the absence of Black Mexico in his book. Bonfil discusses a Mexico made up of Spaniards and Indigenous people, ignoring the already invisible Afro-Mexicano. Feb 23, Victor rated it it was amazing.

This is the best book ever written on the Mexican identity and the schism within it. Batalla argues that Mexico needs a new birth of freedom based on its Indian culture and that years of European domination have failed to lift the nation out of its poverty and corruption. Battalla shows that Mexico remains Indian at its core though the country pretends to be a developing Western nation. Feb 26, Ellie Sharkey rated it liked it. This is a very informative book.

I read this February for Native American History class. The thesis is clear and strongly supported. This is not an easy read but is very good if it is being read for a purpose. This book is a translation so it can be slow at times and challenging to read but is very good.

Jun 22, Salvador Garcia rated it it was amazing. Aug 24, Victor Arellano rated it it was amazing. Nov 16, secondwomn rated it liked it Shelves: Mada rated it liked it Jul 31, E Camou rated it liked it Sep 21, Edna rated it really liked it Dec 06, Sarita rated it it was amazing Jul 01, Joel Thompson rated it really liked it May 30, Scarlett rated it really liked it Dec 22, Dante Zayas rated it it was amazing Aug 18, Edgeral Edgerton rated it liked it Jan 28, Ashlee Skelton rated it did not like it May 22, Stevie rated it liked it Aug 23, Aidan rated it really liked it Dec 14, Fernando Estrella castro rated it it was amazing Dec 14, Karol Ujueta Rojas rated it it was amazing Sep 03, Nina rated it it was amazing Oct 03, There are no discussion topics on this book yet.

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